May 17, 2020

Barlovento Recursos Naturales: Uses Second Wind Triton

barlovento-recursos-naturales-uses-second-wind-triton
Admin
2 min
Second Wind’s Triton®
Barlovento Recursos Naturales, a Spain-based, international wind consultancy and a Measuring Network of Wind Energy Institutes (MEASNET) accredited...


Barlovento Recursos Naturales, a Spain-based, international wind consultancy and a Measuring Network of Wind Energy Institutes (MEASNET) accredited laboratory, is using Second Wind’s Triton® remote sensing system for assessing potential wind farm sites in Spain and Romania.

Barlovento Recursos Naturales is a highly-regarded technical consultancy within the energy industry. The company has been a major player in transforming Spain into a renewable energy powerhouse. The company advises utilities and government agencies on how to develop the country’s renewable resources. Several regions of Spain already generate as much as 82 percent of the country’s power from renewable resources.

Barlovento has assessed over 1,000 wind farm sites worldwide, and is particularly known for its work in Europe and Latin America. The company has been a Second Wind customer, and purchaser of Second Wind Measuring devices, since 2001. The company bought its first Triton unit in 2009 and recently added a second.

"Remote sensing gives us a much broader and deeper data set than we could collect with tower-mounted sensors alone," said Barlovento founder Rafael Zubiaur. "Its accuracy provides a detailed profile of wind flow so we can forecast a site's productivity and how factors like shear and veer may affect wind turbine performance."

Barlovento has trained its staff to install and maintain the Triton units. The company also utilizes the SkyServe® Satellite Wind Data Service® by Second Wind for communicating wind data in 10 minute intervals, via Globalstar Satellite. A secure Web service allows access to wind data online.

"When a highly respected force in renewable energy like Barlovento commits to Triton and remote sensing, that's the ultimate vote of confidence," said Colin France, Director of European Business at Second Wind. "Triton met Barlovento's high standards for accuracy and reliability, and we're looking forward to being a part of their future work to develop wind power resources all over the world."




 

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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