Sep 16, 2017

European home energy management systems double in number – Delta-ee

Jonathan Dyble
2 min
energy management
A report from Delta Energy and Environment (Delta-ee) has revealed that the number of home energy management systems (HEMs) equipped in European hous...

A report from Delta Energy and Environment (Delta-ee) has revealed that the number of home energy management systems (HEMs) equipped in European households was up 100% last year compared to 2015.

HEMs offer a device that is installed within homes to monitor the use of energy and provide advice on how to reduce energy wastage and in turn costs.

The numbers have doubled from 20,000 to 40,000 within the space of a year, a sign of the global push towards greater energy efficiency and sustainability.

“As the market matures, HEM could have a profound impact on energy consumption,” said Principal Analyst and Digital Energy Expert at Delta-ee, Arthur Jouannic.

“At the moment the most obvious value to be gained from installing a system comes from the ability to optimise self-consumption, reducing the burden on the grid. These benefits will only increase as energy storage and solar PV penetrate more of the market. But HEM’s potential value goes much further.

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“As we see the introduction of more favourable regulations and electricity market reform, households will be able to unlock a number of new benefits from HEM systems – not least the reduction of electricity bills without sacrificing on comfort. Of course, it takes time to make reforms but in three-to-five years the rate of change could be very fast indeed – meaning a bright future for HEM.”

The report, titled Home energy management: The state and future of the European market, has shown that the HEM industry is a market that is growing quickly, with both startups and existing companies in the energy sector looking to take advantage.

“Despite starting from a low base, the market is growing very quickly year-on-year. And you’re beginning to see these investments pay off. For instance, Germany’s large PV and storage markets have made it an appealing place from which to launch solutions focused on optimising self-consumption.

“Over the coming years we expect to see similar progress in markets such as France, where self-consumption laws are set to be finalised, and the Nordics.”

Delta-ee predict that sales could come to exceed 200,000 within the near future, as people becoming increasingly aware of the benefits that HEMs can offer.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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