Sep 11, 2017

Next Generation: Solving Australia’s energy problems – Grattan Institute Report

Energy Policy
Power Generation
Jonathan Dyble
2 min
Australia energy
South Australia recently became the most expensive region in the world for power, as electricity prices rose to overtake Denmark following the latest...

South Australia recently became the most expensive region in the world for power, as electricity prices rose to overtake Denmark following the latest hike from the country’s major energy retailers.

“Australians have endured a decade of toxic political debates about climate change policy, South Australians suffered a state-wide blackout last year, consumers across the country are screaming about skyrocketing electricity bills, and energy companies are shutting down big coal-fired power stations,” said Tony Wood, Grattan Institute Energy Program Director.

With all this in mind, the country needs to take measures to solve its ongoing, ever-worsening energy problem.

This is provided in the report named Next Generation: the long term future of the National Electricity Market. Within this, the Grattan Institute calls for preparatory work in the sector on a capacity mechanism, designed to encourage investment into Australia’s energy industry to reduce the threat of shortages and blackouts.

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Capacity mechanisms are an administrative measure, designed ensure a desired level of supply is achieved. However, implementing this would merely be a short term solution, and Australia needs to look to sustainability in the long term.

“It is understandable that governments feel the need to ‘do something’. But the danger is they will rush in and make things worse. What Australia needs now is perspective, not panic,” Wood continues.

The report sets out a three-step policy in both understanding the country’s energy supply and implementing a capacity mechanism if necessary.

  1. The federal government should set out its energy ambitions based on the June 2017 Finkel Review aimed at using new clean energy targets to deliver lower power prices to consumers.
  2. The Australian Energy Market Operator should work alongside the Australian Energy Market Commission to produce an annual assessment that more readily looks at the future adequacy of the generation of energy supply.
  3. If the Energy Security Board deems that energy shortages seem at all likely, then the capacity mechanism should be implemented.

“This pragmatic, planned approach offers the best prospect of affordable, reliable, secure and sustainable power for Australians,” Wood concludes.

This plan has the long-term future of the country in mind, attempting to gauge energy shortages before they occur, whilst also preventing panic from the government in the face of potential blackouts in the short term.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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