Jul 5, 2017

Siemens awarded power generation contract for new Kuwait plant

Middle East
Power Generation
James Henderson
2 min
Siemens has won an order to supply the key power generation equipment for the Sabiya Extension 3 combined cycle power plant in Kuwait. The...

Siemens has won an order to supply the key power generation equipment for the Sabiya Extension 3 combined cycle power plant in Kuwait.

The contract was awarded by the plant owner, the Ministry of Electricity and Water (MEW), to Alghanim International for execution of engineering, procurement and construction (EPC).

The power train will provide an electrical capacity of about 900 megawatts (MW). A long-term service agreement with Alghanim International is also included to help ensure the reliability, availability, and performance of the main components.

The customer, Kuwaiti EPC and O&M contractor Alghanim International, is responsible for constructing the entire plant, establishing the grid connection, and operating and maintaining it.

The country will be able to cover its steadily growing energy demand with the Sabiya Extension 3 plant. The plant will start simple cycle operation in winter of 2019. Commissioning of the combined cycle operation is scheduled for the end of 2020.

“This is the fourth power plant order that Siemens has secured in Kuwait in only four years, following the orders for Sabiya Extensions 1 and 2 and Az Zour South,” said Jean Claude Nasr, Head of Sales for the Middle East & North Africa Region at Siemens Power and Gas.

The natural gas-fired Sabiya Extension 3 is being built on the existing site of the Sabiya power plant on the Bay of Kuwait in the country's northeast. It can also be operated with fuel oil as a back-up fuel. The multi-shaft combined cycle power plant will provide an electrical capacity of over 900 MW.

The power train from Siemens consists of two SGT5-4000F gas turbines, two hydrogen-cooled SGen5-2000H generators, one SST5-5000 steam turbine, and a SGen5-2000H steam turbine generator. 

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May 18, 2021

Toyota unveils electric van and Volvo opens fuel cell lab

Automotive
electricvehicles
fuelcells
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Toyota's Proace Electric medium-duty panel van is being launched across Europe as Volvo opens its first fuel cell test lab

Toyota is launching its first zero emission battery electric vehicle, the Proace Electric medium-duty panel van, across Europe.

The model, which offers a choice of 50 or 75kWh lithium-ion batteries with range of up to 205 miles, is being rolled out in the UK, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Sweden.

At present, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs, including battery electric vehicles) account for only a fraction – around 1.8 per cent – of new light commercial van sales in the UK, but a number of factors are accelerating demand for practical alternatives to vans with conventional internal combustion engines.

Low and zero emission zones are coming into force to reduce local pollution and improve air quality in urban centres, at the same time as rapid growth in ecommerce is generating more day-to-day delivery traffic.

Meanwhile the opening of Volvo's first dedicated fuel cell test lab in Volvo Group, marks a significant milestone in the manufacturer’s ambition to be fossil-free by 2040.

Fuel cells work by combining hydrogen with oxygen, with the resulting chemical reaction producing electricity. The process is completely emission-free, with water vapour being the only by-product.

Toni Hagelberg, Head of Sustainable Power at Volvo CE, says fuel cell technology is a key enabler of sustainable solutions for heavier construction machines, and this investment provides another vital tool in its work to reach targets.

"The lab will also serve Volvo Group globally, as it’s the first to offer this kind of advanced testing," he said.

The Fuel Cell Test Lab is a demonstration of the same dedication to hydrogen fuel cell technology, as the recent launch of cell centric, a joint venture by Volvo Group and Daimler Truck to accelerate the development, production and commercialization of fuel cell solutions within long-haul trucking and beyond. Both form a key part of the Group’s overall ambition to be 100% fossil free by 2040.

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