May 17, 2020

Renewables Yield More U.S. Power than Nuclear

energy digital
Renewable Energy
Nuclear power
Renewables
Admin
2 min
In a recent study, renewables show more growth in the US than nuclear
Renewable energy trumped nuclear power in US domestic energy production for the first nine months of 2011, according to a report from the US Energy In...

 

Renewable energy trumped nuclear power in US domestic energy production for the first nine months of 2011, according to a report from the US Energy Information Administration (EIA). In its latest monthly energy review, the EIA found that 11.95 percent of energy produced in the first three quarters of the year came from renewable sources, compared to 10.62 percent from nuclear.

Among the renewable sources of energy recorded, hydropower contributed the most to domestic energy, with a whopping 4.35 percent, followed by biomass (3.15 percent) and biofuels (2.57 percent). Furthermore, renewable energy accounted for 12.73 percent of net electricity generation in the US.

Despite skeptics' accusations that renewables still have a long way to go, these reports show just how fast it's actually growing—we need to be reminded by numbers every once and a while.

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In the first three months of 2011, renewable electrical output increased by over 25 percent; solar-generated electricity increased by over 104 percent; wind by over 40 percent; hydropower by over 28 percent; and geothermal by over 5 percent. Comparably, nuclear-generated electricity increased by a mere 0.4 percent and coal-generated electricity dropped by 5.7 percent.

However, these numbers can be somewhat misleading. Nuclear still accounts for over 20 percent of all US electricity, compared to just 5.2 percent from all renewable energy. But, it should be noted that nuclear has had a headstart compared to most forms of renewable energy and that more projects are planned for renewable energy than any other form of energy. In solar power alone, there are 30,000 megawatts worth of projects waiting approval in the US (ten times what is already installed), according to the American Public Power Association. It's just a matter of time before renewables trump nuclear and coal completely, so long as the government enforces policies to help with the transition.

 

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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