Feb 13, 2018

International Institute of Diamond Grading and Research installs 34.8kw solar roof in India

Diamonds
Sustainability
Dale Benton
2 min
A diamond grading and inscription facility in India has become one of the first diamond lab in the industry to utilise solar power. The Int...

A diamond grading and inscription facility in India has become one of the first diamond lab in the industry to utilise solar power.

The International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR), which falls under the De Beers Group of companies, has installed a 34.8-kilowatt solar rood at its inscription and grading facility in Surat, India, providing the facility with a renewable energy supply.

The roof will generate an average of 56,000 units of electricity each year, reducing heat loads by 90% and “significantly decreasing” the electricity used for air-conditioning.

Jonathan Kendall, President, IIDGR, said: “Over the past two years we've measured our carbon footprint and used this information to adapt our business practices in order to reduce our environmental impact and generate cost-savings in our energy and water consumption.

 

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“Sustainability is key for De Beers and this new solar operation is very much in line with our core beliefs. Meanwhile, the installation of the plant provides financial benefits alongside the positive environmental impact, so we hope to see a continued focus on initiatives such as this across the sector.”

Becoming one of the first in the diamond industry to use solar power, the solar plant has a 25-year lifecycle and will have paid for itself within five years as a result of the savings on electricity expenditure.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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