Oct 3, 2017

New vehicles designed by Volvo Trucks set to cut CO2 emissions by 20 to 100%

Sustainability
Sophie Chapman
2 min
Truck
Volvo Trucks is now launching new trucks that can cut CO2 emissions by 20 to 100%. Due to the company’s new focus on ene...

Volvo Trucks is now launching new trucks that can cut CO2 emissions by 20 to 100%.

Due to the company’s new focus on energy efficiency and environmental impact, it has  created two new heavy, long-haul vehicles that will drastically lower climate impact.

Volvo are offering Euro 6-compliant, gas-powered trucks that match the performance and efficiency of diesel-powered trucks  but have a significantly lower climate impact.

The Volvo FH LNG and the Volvo FM MNG can run on either biogas, which can cut CO2 up to 100%, or natural gas, which reduces CO2 emissions by 20% compared  to using diesel.

When compared to the current gas-powered trucks that are currently on the market, Volvo new launch will be using 15% to 25% less fuel.

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Mats Franzén, Product Manager Engines at Volvo Trucks, commented: “Our new trucks running on liquefied natural gas or biogas produce a far smaller climate footprint than diesel trucks do.

“In addition, they are much more fuel-efficient than the gas-powered trucks available on the market today.”

“This makes gas more viable as a replacement for diesel even for heavy long-haul operations.”

For an operator that covers 120,000 km per year in heavy transport, by choosing natural gas instead of diesel it can cut CO2 emissions by 18 to 20 tonnes. With the huge 264,000 heavy trucks registered within the EU last year, this has great potential for reducing emissions.

“We regard LNG as a long-term first choice alternative to diesel, both for regional and long-haul truck operations where fuel efficiency, payload and productivity are crucial,” stated Lars Mårtensson, Director Environment and Innovation at Volvo Trucks.

“With a higher proportion of biogas, climate impact can be reduced far more. For transport operations in urban environments, where range is not as critical, electrified vehicles will play a greater role in the future.”

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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