May 30, 2018

Scotland aims to cut emissions by 90% by 2050

UK
Climate Change
Sophie Chapman
2 min
Scotland has released the draft of its climate change strategy, which outlines plans to cut the nation’s greenhouse gas e...

Scotland has released the draft of its climate change strategy, which outlines plans to cut the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions.

The country has announced that it aims to reduce its emissions by two-thirds by 2030 with the ultimate goal of hitting a 90% reduction by 2050.

Following 2050, Scotland wants to reduce its emissions by 100% “as soon as possible”.

The nation has confirmed that it does not want to meet its target through carbon offsetting, and that it will be relaunching a climate change fund for applications, as well as establishing an advisory panel to help achieve the goal.

The UK Committee on Climate Change has deemed the plan “at the limit of feasibility”.

“Our 90% target will be tougher even than the 100% goal set by a handful of other countries, because our legislation will set more demanding, legally-binding, annual targets covering every sector of our economy,” stated Roseanna Cunningham, Scotland’s Environment Secretary.

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“The fight against climate change is a moral responsibility but Scotland's academic and engineering expertise, coupled with our outstanding natural resources, mean it is also an economic opportunity.”

However, the strategy has received criticism for not setting a deadline for reaching zero emissions.

“The government claims Scotland will be one of the first countries to achieve zero emissions, but the bill does not commit to that,” remarked Tom Ballantine, Chair of Sop Climate Chaos Scotland.

“By failing to ally with the global momentum towards zero emissions, led by countries like France, Sweden and New Zealand, Scotland is missing a huge opportunity to end its contribution to climate change in a generation, attract clean investment and retain its position as a leader on the global stage.”

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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