Scotland’s household carbon footprint reduced by 25%

By Sophie Chapman
According to findings from WWF Scotland, the average Scottish household has reduced its carbon footprint by 25% over the previous eight years...

According to findings from WWF Scotland, the average Scottish household has reduced its carbon footprint by 25% over the previous eight years.

WWF Scotland also discovered that climate damage that was inflicted by household heating has fallen since 2009, when the Scottish Climate Change Act was passed.

The country has been implementing a variety of new sustainable tactics as well as having a growth in renewables.

Scotland has set a target to source at least 50% of its energy from renewable sources by 2030, and currently more than half of the nation’s electricity output is renewable.

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“These figures show that individuals across Scotland and governments at every level have played a part in cutting the climate damage of our home energy usage,” WWF Scotland acting head of policy Gina Hanrahan said.

“When it comes to cutting our emissions, and protecting ourselves, the places and nature we hold dear from the worst effects of climate change, we all need to continue to do our bit.”

In 2017, the country became home to the world’s first floating offshore wind farm and received approval for its largest solar farm.

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