Apr 29, 2020

KSTAR utilises new inverter in 320 MW solar-water plant

Renewable Energy
Green Tech
William Girling
2 min
Shenzhen KSTAR Science and Technology Co. (KSTAR) has released details of the deployment of its new inverter technology in a 320 MW solar-water plant
Shenzhen KSTAR Science and Technology Co. (KSTAR) has released details of th...

Shenzhen KSTAR Science and Technology Co. (KSTAR) has released details of the deployment of its new inverter technology in a 320 MW solar-water plant.

Called GSL2500C-MV and GSL1250, the inverters are 99% energy efficient and play a core role in the US100mn, 120 MW second-phase of a solar-water power plant in Cixi city, Zhejiang, China. The plant began operations in late December 2019.

Phase I of the project was a 200 MW installation at the Zhouxiang reservoirs in Cixi. Costing $250mn, this plant became active in 2017 and represents the largest solar-water facility in China to date.

Innovation for the energy sector

Inverters are an essential component for renewable energy projects as they convert DC (direct current) into AC (alternating current) which can be used in conventional electrical grids. 

KSTAR’s solution is optimised to shorten construction time, save operational costs and enable faster maintenance. The company lists the four primary advantages of its inverters as:

  1. Low overall cost - Designed to be highly energy-efficient, KSTAR’s inverters use less energy, thus reducing systems costs. 

  2. Advanced design - Structured to dissipate heat energy via an air duct, the inverters also feature a cooling fan which only activates once a maximum temperature has been reached.

  3. Resistant to corrosion - A strong necessity for a solar-water power plant, KSTAR’s tech can withstand heavy salt fog and high levels of humidity.

  4. Highly adaptable - Believing that tech should fit the situation and not vice versa, KSTAR makes its products on a turnkey basis which can be adjusted to meet a project’s specific requirements.

SEE ALSO:

Enabling clean energy

KSTAR’s contribution to the 320 MW solar-water plant will help contribute approximately 352mn KWh of renewable electricity per year. 

Useful not just for its carbon mitigating potential (189,200 tonnes annually), large-scale renewable energy projects such as these can play a vital role in stabilising China’s electrical grids and create greater equality.

Speaking in a press release, Gary Ye, Vice-GM of KSTAR, said, “It is a pleasure that we supply the intelligent turnkey solutions for the big project. We are encouraged by the fact that the products have received wide attention and recognition from our industry customers, colleagues, and media.

“We will continue to work hard to meet the growing demands of our old and new customers.”

For more information on energy digital topics - please take a look at the latest edition of Energy Digital Magazine.

Follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Share article

May 18, 2021

Toyota unveils electric van and Volvo opens fuel cell lab

Automotive
electricvehicles
fuelcells
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Toyota's Proace Electric medium-duty panel van is being launched across Europe as Volvo opens its first fuel cell test lab

Toyota is launching its first zero emission battery electric vehicle, the Proace Electric medium-duty panel van, across Europe.

The model, which offers a choice of 50 or 75kWh lithium-ion batteries with range of up to 205 miles, is being rolled out in the UK, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Sweden.

At present, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs, including battery electric vehicles) account for only a fraction – around 1.8 per cent – of new light commercial van sales in the UK, but a number of factors are accelerating demand for practical alternatives to vans with conventional internal combustion engines.

Low and zero emission zones are coming into force to reduce local pollution and improve air quality in urban centres, at the same time as rapid growth in ecommerce is generating more day-to-day delivery traffic.

Meanwhile the opening of Volvo's first dedicated fuel cell test lab in Volvo Group, marks a significant milestone in the manufacturer’s ambition to be fossil-free by 2040.

Fuel cells work by combining hydrogen with oxygen, with the resulting chemical reaction producing electricity. The process is completely emission-free, with water vapour being the only by-product.

Toni Hagelberg, Head of Sustainable Power at Volvo CE, says fuel cell technology is a key enabler of sustainable solutions for heavier construction machines, and this investment provides another vital tool in its work to reach targets.

"The lab will also serve Volvo Group globally, as it’s the first to offer this kind of advanced testing," he said.

The Fuel Cell Test Lab is a demonstration of the same dedication to hydrogen fuel cell technology, as the recent launch of cell centric, a joint venture by Volvo Group and Daimler Truck to accelerate the development, production and commercialization of fuel cell solutions within long-haul trucking and beyond. Both form a key part of the Group’s overall ambition to be 100% fossil free by 2040.

Share article