May 22, 2017

Offshore wind turbine market revenue expected to double by 2025

Renewable Energy
Wind
Nell Walker
2 min
Offshore wind turbine market revenue expected to double by 2025
Transparency Market Research has released a report which sho...

Transparency Market Research has released a report which shows that global offshore wind turbine market revenue is projected to reach $58,729.7 million by 2025, at a compound annual growth rate of 7.7 percent between 2017 and 2015. In 2016, the revenue was $29,418.9 million.

The cumbersomely-named report – Offshore Wind Turbine Market by Foundation Type (Monopile, Jacket, Tripod, Floating and Others) by Application (Shallow Water, Transient Water and Deep Water) by Capacity (up to 1MW, 1-3 MW, 3-5 MW and Above 5 MW) and by Region (North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific and Middle East & Africa) - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast, 2017-2025 – explores the present state of the wind energy industry and what we can expect in the future. Currently, the offshore turbine market is dominated by Europe, which along with Asia Pacific is expected to provide particular growth potential in the run-up to 2025.

Currently, China holds the key share of offshore wind turbines worldwide. Sector reforms mean Mexico is now pushing the wind power industry, but promising markets like Latin America are hindered by restrictive political interference.

While offshore turbines are normally set up in shallower waters, market trends are moving towards deeper waters – up to 60 metres – for new wind farms to be installed within the proposed time frame. This will be somewhat of an experiment, as it is not yet known how more water will affect the turbines. Onshore and offshore turbines have different modifications to suit their requirements, and that changes depending on location too.

Some of the major current players in the offshore wind turbine market are Siemens Wind Power, Nordex S.E., GE Wind Energy, Guodian United Power Technology Company Ltd, Gamesa Corporacion Technologica S.A., and Upwind Solutions Inc. While some aspects of wind energy's development and expansion over the next eight years will be a learning curve, the ambitious forecast appears entirely achievable given the ever-changing and developing renewable energy landscape.

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Apr 23, 2021

Drax advances biomass strategy with Pinnacle acquisition

Drax
Biomass
Sustainability
BECCS
Dominic Ellis
2 min
Drax is advancing biomass following Pinnacle acquisition it reported in a trading update

Drax' recently completed acquisition of Pinnacle more than doubles its sustainable biomass production capacity and significantly reduces its cost of production, it reported in a trading update.

The Group’s enlarged supply chain will have access to 4.9 million tonnes of operational capacity from 2022. Of this total, 2.9 million tonnes are available for Drax’s self-supply requirements in 2022, which will rise to 3.4 million tonnes in 2027.

The £424 million acquisition of the Canadian biomass pellet producer supports Drax' ambition to be carbon negative by 2030, using bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and will make a "significant contribution" in the UK cutting emissions by 78% by 2035 (click here).

Drax CEO Will Gardiner said its Q1 performance had been "robust", supported by the sale of Drax Generation Enterprise, which holds four CCGT power stations, to VPI Generation.

This summer Drax will undertake maintenance on its CfD(2) biomass unit, including a high-pressure turbine upgrade to reduce maintenance costs and improve thermal efficiency, contributing to lower generation costs for Drax Power Station.

In March, Drax secured Capacity Market agreements for its hydro and pumped storage assets worth around £10 million for delivery October 2024-September 2025.

The limitations on BECCS are not technology but supply, with every gigatonne of CO2 stored per year requiring approximately 30-40 million hectares of BECCS feedstock, according to the Global CCS Institute. Nonetheless, BECCS should be seen as an essential complement to the required, wide-scale deployment of CCS to meet climate change targets, it concludes.

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